China – Under The Hood: Time for ‘Wang Yue’s Law’ – the criminality of indifference

The tragic death of little Wang Yue  (“Yue Yue”) from Foshan, who died days after being hit by vans and ignored by witnesses (source:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-15398332) is truly a dreadful story that will likely (in addition to the Wenzhou subprime crisis and the horrible child kidnapping stories of late) be used as a political weapon by power struggling leaders in Beijing who have gathered to focus on “proposing new ideas for reform and development culture into the 21st century”, basically planning the future cultural direction of China. That’s for sure. And the quickest assumption they’ll come to? Blame all the nastiness on negative western influences…they use the word “destructive“. Well  these troubles have nothing to do with destructive western influences. At the heart of these stories is the thinking “I don’t give a damn about anyone else except me“, and that, I’m afraid, is both an educational issue and SYSTEM issue…. A system that doesn’t observe basic human values is a broken system.

"Mo Bu Guan Xin" means "indifferent"

“Mo Bu Guan Xin” means “indifferent”

Yet, from such a tragedy there has to be a positive, something constructive… and there is: the massive outpouring of anger in China at the indifference. The vast majority of Chinese people care. Like the rubbish collector, they have a heart and a conscience. Right? Otherwise how can a society function? In every country in the world, including my own, equal horrors arise followed by plenty of brow-beating and introspection.

Readers in the USA and UK will be familiar with Megan’s Law and Sarah’s Law respectively. Both girls were murdered by child killers, and following campaigns by their families the laws were changed to protect children. While the Wang Yue tragedy is under a different set of circumstances, nonetheless let’s hope a Wang Yue Law will punish the indifference to helping a fellow human-being in distress. China is waking up not just in an economic sense, but more importantly, social sense.

“Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter”

Martin Luther King

Wang Yue Foshan China Hit and Run

Source / read more: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-15398332

1 Comment

Filed under China, Culture, Indifference

One response to “China – Under The Hood: Time for ‘Wang Yue’s Law’ – the criminality of indifference

  1. Whether a law does get passed or not, one thing is certain, some changes will definitely be made. A lot of people saw the ugly face of apathy, the kind of indifference that snuffed out the life of an innocent little baby. People will always have the image of that tiny little baby being crushed under those vehicles in their minds and think twice before allowing something like that happen to a stranger in need, specially to children in need. A lot of positive changes will come about both in law and in people’s treatment of their fellow human being. A lot of future good samaritan’s would tell the people they helped that the story of little Yue inspired them to do good. But it is still a shame that a thing like that could happen. I would like to apologize to little Yue, Im so sorry baby, words could never express how sorry I am, I probably would not let anything like that happen to you, but I am sorry for all the times I have been indifferent to the needs of others. Apathy and indifference have no place in modern society, your life shouldn’t have been sacrifice to make people realize that. I hope that when my time comes, I would have a chance to see you and tell you how sorry I am. Rest in peace baby Yue, I love you baby. Please forgive us…

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