Parnell Street’s Chinese community

 

Chinese Community Parnell Street 001.jpgUrban blight, neglected and abandoned Georgian buildings, and poor quality streetscape have long bedevilled the character of Parnell Street East, which is just off the northeast end of Dublin‘s O’Connell Street, a street apparently forgotten by Dublin City Council planners.

Chinese Community Parnell Street 008.JPG

Be that as it may, the presence of Asian supermarkets, hair salons, internet cafes, sidewalk fruit and vegetable stalls,  noodle houses, and restaurants all with their own distinctive signage also testify to Parnell Street East’s organic development over the past 20 years as an ethnic precinct.

Chinese Community Parnell Street 003

Indeed, in many ways the bustle of daily life on Parnell Street East, the focal point for the largest concentration of the Chinese immigrants living and working in Dublin, resembles a typical Chinese (mainland, Taiwan, and Hong Kong included) street. The shops and restaurants provide important social gathering places for the Chinese community, while Dublin’s discerning foodies are more and more drawn to its ever expanding rich diversity of authentic and delicious Chinese and Asian eateries.

This orientation as an ethic precinct adds up to a civic asset that could be capitalised upon to incite economic growth, tourism and opportunities for new immigrants. Hitherto, Dublin City Council has yet to recognise this ethnic area as a civic asset, which sets our capital city apart from other significant international cities, such as London, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Rome and Paris, all of which have distinguished multi-cultural Chinatown districts.

Chinese Community Parnell Street 016

The completion of the Luas Cross City single track loop, with a Parnell Luas tram stop located in front of Marlborough House, will be an essential element in the regeneration of the precinct. It also presents Dublin City Council with a unique opportunity to build, following consultations with the Chinese and other local community stakeholders, on the ethnic character of the street by creating a vibrant district of local businesses and traders that consolidates the distinctive ethnic diversity of the precinct.

Plant more trees, consider making a space for an oriental style park or garden, play to the strengths of the street and its community. Above all talk to the residents who have reinvented Parnell Street East.

The photographs above depicting every day life on Parnell Street were shot over a two days period, March 4th and March 5th 2017 (Copyright @ Niall J. O’Reilly 2017)

When both the day and night are of equal length: March 20th

It’s March 20th again, the day of the Spring Equinox (chunfen 春分), when the centre of the Sun spends the same amount of time above and below the horizon, such that night and day are the same length everywhere.

It’s also World Storytelling Day. On this day March 20th 1916 Albert Einstein published his general theory of relativity, while closer to home my Grandfather, Captain Michael William “M.W.” O’Reilly was likely dividing his time between his job as Assistant Superintendent Clontarf District at Prudential Insurance and as a Captain of the Irish Volunteers, preparing for what was to be the ultimate challenge to British rule in Ireland: The 1916 Easter Rising (Read more at  http://wp.me/p15Yzr-R ).

The Roman poet (Ovid), a German theologian (Jerome Emser), the first monarch of the reigning Chakri dynasty in Thailand (Buddha Yodfa Chulaloke, a.k.a Rama I), a Norwegian writer (Henrik Ibsen), a French Emperor (Napolean Bonaparte II) and the last President of the Fourth Republic (Rene Coty), the “Forces’ Sweetheart” (Dame Vera Lynn), America actor (William Hurt),  and blues singer (Marva Wright), a Mexican Nobel Peace Prize winner (Alfonso Garcia Robles), a Japanese long-distance runner (Kenji Kimihara), Canadians the 18th prime minister of Canada (Brian Mulroney) and one of the greatest ice hockey players of all time (Bobby Orr), a Russian composer, pianist and conductor (Sergei Rachmaninoff), a Greek journalist and Communist Party politician (Liana Kanelli), a world champion Australian woodchopper (David Foster), a Danish footballer (Jesper Olsen), and an Irish portrait and wartime painter (Sir John Lavery) were all born on March 20th, or the Cusp of Rebirth as the Pisces (the 12th and final Sign of the Zodiac) and Aries (the first Sign of the Zodiac) cusp combination is known.

This is a most favourable and desirable cusp, indicative of a union between intelligence and understanding. In essence, these cuspians are likely to possess strong mental powers coupled with the priceless gift of comprehension. The chief characteristics of this blend are vigilance and caution…each step carefully weighed prior to being taken”“The power of intuition inherent in these natives is truly quite remarkable and they rarely go amiss when they rely upon their own judgment as formulated by their intuition. There is an extremely keen and valuable foresight here in all matters of a financial nature and these subjects will work out in advance the most brilliant of schemes and projects which are then executed with total success. The minds of these cuspians are always busily engaged in devising plans for new enterprises and projects. Indeed, perhaps the novelty of a certain scheme holds the most attraction for the Mars/Neptune individual”. Source: http://www.novareinna.com/constellation/ariescusp.html

March 20th marks the first day of the Iranian calendar, while in Azerbaijan, Afghanistan, Zanzibar, and Albania it’s a holiday.

Now there are 286 days remaining until the end of the year.

Happy Birthday me  Birthday cakeGift with a bow . I am 20,454 days old today!

When both the day and night are of equal length: March 20th - My Birth place 18,000 days ago. Portobello Nursing Home (now Portobello College) Dublin
My Birth place 20,254 days ago. Portobello Nursing Home (now Portobello College) Dublin
When both the day and night are of equal length: March 20th - My Birth place 18,000 days ago - 1963 - a most remarkable year
The Year of the Water Rabbit 1963 – An amazing year!

Born on the cusp - Pisces Aries - When both the day and night are of equal length 004 - March 20thBorn on the cusp - Pisces Aries - When both the day and night are of equal length 002 - March 20thBorn on the cusp - Pisces - Aries - When both the day and night are of equal length - March 20th  Born on the cusp - Pisces Aries - When both the day and night are of equal length 008 - March 20thBorn on the cusp - Pisces Aries - When both the day and night are of equal length 005 - March 20th

Born on the cusp - Pisces Aries - When both the day and night are of equal length 006 - March 20th Born on the cusp - Pisces Aries - When both the day and night are of equal length - March 20thBorn on the cusp - Pisces Aries - When both the day and night are of equal length 007 - March 20th2019

2019

2019

Accurate China Insight: Ireland’s Presidency of the Council of The European Union to further enhance Chinese ties

Commencing in January, for the first half of 2013, Ireland‘s Presidency of the Council of The European Union provides a fantastic opportunity for Ireland to yet again punch above its weight in the eyes of China‘s leaders and media.

Ireland's Presidency of the Council of The European Union to further enhance Chinese ties

Moreover, EU-China -related summits in Ireland will provide Europeans with their first real chance to measure the mind-set of China‘s new leadership towards its biggest trading partner.

Hopefully the relevant agencies Tourism Ireland, Bord Bia, Enterprise Ireland, Industrial Development Authority of Ireland (IDA), etc., have given due consideration to the huge marketing potential this unique six month long occurrence offers.

Following on from a very successful trip to Ireland in February 2012 by the incumbent General Secretary of the Communist Party of China, China’s paramount leader Xi JinPing, expect an enduring stream of visits by Chinese leaders and media to our shores, wowed by loads of Irish hospitality (whether a caman, sliotar, bodhran, uilleann pipes, Irish coffee, Guinness, visits to Irish farms), intertwined with stunning rustic backdrops, a clear understanding of what Ireland has to offer as world-class centre of excellence in sciences, software and telecoms, financial and education services, and in terms of investment and Euro Zone access opportunities for Chinese companies: All aimed at ensuring their visits to Ireland will be in their minds for a very long time when they return home to China.

Source: http://www.accuratelimited.com/blog.view.php?id=+8G9kXqGg28=

Chinese Government officials relaxing at O'Donoghue's Pub Merrion Row Dublin - Accurate Group - Ireland China Business Consultancy

Niall O’Reilly

Managing Director, Accurate GroupIreland China Product & Business Development (Export Source Import) Advisers

Tel: +353 1271 1830 / +86 152 5719 4468

http://www.accuratelimited.com

Protected: A True Irish Patriot: My father’s father, Dr. Michael William “M.W.” O’Reilly

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Special Olympics World Summer Games Euphoria – From Dublin 2003 to Shanghai 2007

Wow! It’s already over four years since the last Special Olympics World Summer Games were hosted Dublin. It was the largest sports event ever hosted in Ireland.

From 2nd to 11th October the 2007 Special Olympics World Summer Games will be hosted by Shanghai [http://www.2007specialolympics.com], the first of the three Olympic Games to be staged in China over the next 14 months, including the Summer Olympics and the Paralympic Games to be held next Summer in Beijing.

Unlike now, the days before the Special Olympics World Summer Games 2003 in Dublin were mired in controversy. At the time both Hong Kong and China were affected by the outbreak of the illness known as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the Irish Government fearful of SARS spreading to Ireland decided to ban the Hong Kong Special Olympics team from traveling to Ireland to compete at the Games. There was outrage in Hong Kong with protests outside the office of the Honorary Consul of Ireland. For me what was particular odious about this decision was the fact that business men and women were still allowed to freely travel to Ireland.

In Ireland on the radio, television and in the newspapers there was intense debate about the Irish Government’s decision. Living and working in Hong Kong there was a palpable sense of outage amongst the Irish community. Something had to be done. I decided to write two letters. The first which was published on 6th June, was to the Irish Examiner newspaper, while the second letter was to Chairman of the Organising Committee, Mr. Denis O’Brien (who was also an investor in the company I was working for at the time).

Irish Examiner Newpaper

Friday 6th June, 2003

 “Hong Kong’s special athletes hit by a peculiar Irish infection”

I WRITE in response to the latest “final” June 4 decision of the Department of Health and Children’s expert group on SARS and the Special Olympics to maintain its ban on Hong Kong’s disabled athletes travelling to Ireland, thus depriving them of the chance to attend what likely would be the most thrilling event in their lives.

This illogical decision comes after a period of unprecedented high-level dialogue between senior Hong Kong government officials and Irish medical experts in which the Hong Kong side sought to articulate a clearer understanding of the situation and the extra efforts that it would make to guarantee the health of its athletes before departure.

It is almost two weeks since the World Health Organisation (WHO) announced the lifting of its travel advisory against Hong Kong, noting that SARS outbreaks had been contained, which is not much different to its observations regarding the status of Canada and mainland China.

In fact, all new SARS cases confirmed in Hong Kong over the past month (an average of fewer than five cases per day compared to upwards of 60 daily at the end of March) have occurred in people who were already identified as contacts of a person with SARS and under active surveillance by the local health authorities.

None of the Hong Kong Special Olympics athletes hoping to travel to Ireland has had contact with any SARS patients, or any suspected cases.

The WHO has highly commended Hong Kong’s transparency and aggressive Hong Kong Special Olympics procedures.

All close contacts of known SARS cases are quarantined at home.

In addition, their Hong Kong ID numbers are passed to the immigration department to ensure that they cannot leave the territory.

Since the implementation of these rigorous exit-screening procedures at border checkpoints, which also include mandatory temperature checking of all outbound travellers, there have been no reports of internationally exported cases of SARS from Hong Kong.

What is more, the US Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended against cancelling or postponing gatherings that will include people travelling to the US from areas with SARS, and the quarantine of persons arriving from SARS-affected areas who have shown no fever or respiratory symptoms.

As such, over the past fortnight Hong Kong exhibitors have been welcomed to the Las Vegas Jewellery Fair and the Cannes Film Festival as a result of the precautionary measures that the exhibitors had undertaken voluntarily.

And yet, it is against such transparency that Ireland still maintains its travel ban depriving athletes, some of whom have trained for up to eight years and whose team won 53 gold medals at the last Special Olympics, their chance to be the pride of Hong Kong.

Remarkably, no such travel ban has been imposed on other travellers from Hong Kong seeking entry to Ireland.

This ‘final’ decision appears not only irrational, but also hypocritical, given the latest guidelines conveniently lifting the travel ban on athletes from cities and regions where local transmission of SARS has not been reported, meaning that the Special Olympic Games will not be devoid of two of the largest participating teams, Canada and China.

It demonstrates that the Department of Health and Children has chosen not to follow the WHO‘s advice and made a decision without due regard to the precautionary measures that the Hong Kong Special Olympics Committee had proposed to take before their departure for the games.

The official flag presentation ceremony for the Hong Kong Special Olympics team is set to take place here on June 8, an event supported by The Hong Kong Gaelic Athletic Association, the St Patrick’s Society of Hong Kong, the Irish Business Forum and Enterprise Ireland.

It is the fervent wish of the Irish community in Hong Kong that the Irish government remove this unnecessary travel ban.

Niall O’Reilly,

15, Mosque Street,

Mid-Levels,

Hong Kong.

[Source: This story appeared in the printed version of the Irish Examiner Friday, June 06, 2003 

http://www.irishexaminer.com/archives/2003/0606/ireland/hong-kongaposs-special-athletes-hit-by-a-peculiar-irish-infection-983257838.html]

The about-turn was remarkable.

Three days before the Opening Ceremony in Dublin, without prior notice, at 3.00 am I was awaken by the loud ringing sound of my telephone.  On the other end of the line was Denis O’Brien excitedly describing the excellent news that the Irish Government had decided to lift its travel ban and that the special athletes from Hong Kong were free to travel to Ireland. Denis O’Brien also offered to send his private jet to collect the Hong Kong team from London.

The Special Olympics World Summer Games in Dublin were a wonderful success, and I have heard from several people who were lucky enough to attend, the Opening Ceremony or witness it television that one of the most emotional memories of the evening was the arrival in the Croke Park stadium of the Hong Kong team when the packed house of 80,000 people stood up to cheer them these very special athletes. 

For me the abiding memory that will stay with me is being invited to represent the Irish Community of Hong Kong at the welcome home ceremony for the successful Hong Kong team. The sparkling smiles on the faces of the Hong Kong Special Olympics athletes, bedecked with gleaming gold and silver medals, will always stay in my mind.

“On June 19, I had the privilege of carrying the Olympic Torch – or Flame of Hope as it is called – and leading the Final Leg Torch Run team into Clonmel. Clonmel is a town of about 25,000 people and I would estimate that about half were on the streets to greet us. I have never seen so many Hong Kong flags in my life. They flew from the rooftops, from the buildings, from the churches and from the hands of thousands of people on the streets. And everyone was shouting Hong Kong! Hong Kong! at the tops of their voices.

“We ran into the town square where the Lord Mayor was present to greet us. I handed over the Flame of Hope. The Mayor took me to one side and told me that the Hong Kong team had not arrived. They were still in Macao under quarantine for SARS.

“To have run so far (over 200 miles) and not see the Hong Kong team was heartbreaking. I am not ashamed to say that I fell to my knees and wept.

“However, the Mayor told me that the Hong Kong team would be arriving in Dublin the following day and that a delegation from Clonmel would go to meet and welcome them. On the evening of June 21, we carried the Flame of Hope into Croke Park, Dublin, for the start of the games.

“The Special Olympics teams then marched into Croke Park in alphabetical order. I heard the master of ceremonies say “And now I see a particular team coming into the stadium. This is a team that we thought we would never see. But now they are here and we are so pleased to see them. Give a big, big welcome for Hong Kong!” About 85,000 people stood up and at the tops of their voices shouted: Hong Kong! Hong Kong! The noise was unbelievable! But it was obviously inspiring Ñ the Hong Kong Special Olympics team won 31 medals at this year’s games.

“I had a wonderful career with the Hong Kong Police Force and have had a wonderful life. But nothing in my experience is likely to top the emotion that I felt running for Hong Kong on the Law Enforcement Final Leg Torch Run.”

Source: Mr Peter Halliday, former Assistant Commissioner (Information Systems), Hong Kong Police Force helped carry the Special Olympics Games torch from Athens to Dublin http://www.police.gov.hk/offbeat/757/eng/s01.htm

"Special Olympics has not only given me the opportunity to compete, but also the confidence to compete. I am very proud of my accomplishments, and where else would I get to travel around the world?" (Source: Mei-Yu Lau - http://couch-gymnast.blogspot.com.es/2008/11/cartwheels-in_21.html ]
Gymnast Mei-Yu Lau, Team Hong Kong, on the vault at the 2003 Special Olympics Summer Games in Dublin: “Special Olympics has not only given me the opportunity to compete, but also the confidence to compete. I am very proud of my accomplishments, and where else would I get to travel around the world?”                                (Source: Mei-Yu Lau – http://couch-gymnast.blogspot.com.es/2008/11/cartwheels-in_21.html )

And so fast forward to late next week when a delegation of 1,000 Irish Special Olympians and their families will arrive in Shanghai to participate in the Special Olympics World Summer Games, 2007. Let the Games begin!

[Note: Special Olympics is an international non-profit organization dedicated to helping individuals with intellectual disabilities to become physically fit, productive and respected members of society through sports training and competition]

Note: My review of the Special Olympics World Summer Games, 2000, in Shanghai  ‘Words matter: Mentally retarded or human gift? Looking back at the Special Olympics World Summer Games in Shanghai’ is posted here: 

https://nialljoreilly.com/2007/11/08/words-matter-mentally-retarded-or-human-gift-looking-back-at-the-special-olympics-world-summer-games-in-shanghai/ ]